The Friday news briefing: An at-a-glance survey of some top stories - 660 NEWS
Loading articles...

The Friday news briefing: An at-a-glance survey of some top stories

Last Updated Nov 17, 2017 at 3:20 pm MST

Highlights from the news file for Friday, Nov. 17

———

CAN CANADA’S PEACEKEEPING COMMITMENT GIVE IT A SHOT AT THE UN SECURITY COUNCIL?: Some international observers are wondering if Canada’s new commitment to peacekeeping will be enough to eventually win a seat on the United Nations Security Council. The federal government announced this week it will provide a rapid reaction force of 200 soldiers, far fewer than the 600 troops and 150 police officers it promised a year ago. John Trent, a retired University of Ottawa political science professor, says Canada has turned down a number of major requests to join UN peacekeeping operations in the past two years and that will make it tougher to win Asian and African votes for the security council seat.

———

AMERICAN BUSINESS GROUP WEIGHS IN ON NAFTA DEBATE: The U.S. Chamber of Commerce says the American states that would be hit hardest if the North American Free Trade Agreement was to be scrapped were in the Donald Trump column in last year’s presidential vote. The chamber is stepping up its efforts to save NAFTA amid threats of a U.S. pullout from the negotiations. It issued a release on Friday showing the states exporting the most to Canada and Mexico in total dollars. Trump carried all the states and they delivered more than half of his electoral college votes. The three countries have gathered in Mexico City for the latest round of talks.

———

MANITOBA PREMIER INJURED WHILE HIKING: Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister suffered a broken arm while hiking in New Mexico. The premier’s office says Pallister suffered a serious fall. He is being brought back to Manitoba to determine if surgery is needed. Pallister was on vacation during a one-week break between legislature sessions.

———

SECURITY FORUM BEGINS IN HALIFAX: Nuclear weapons, climate change, Russian relations and the role of women in peacekeeping are among the topics being covered at the Halifax International Security Forum this weekend. Representatives from more than 70 countries are gathered for the forum. Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan told reporters the forum provides a “unique” opportunity for political leaders, military strategists and security experts to discuss challenges facing nations.

———

FEDS PUT UP HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS TO COMBAT GUN VIOLENCE: Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale says the federal government is putting up $327.6 million over five years to try to curb gun and gang violence. The federal government will spend after the initial five year period. The money will finance programs aimed at cutting gun crime, gang activities and reducing the flow of illegal firearms into communities.

———

MOTHER GIVEN THREE-YEAR SENTENCE IN SON’S DEATH: A Calgary court has handed a three-year prison sentence to a woman who didn’t take her son to a doctor for a strep infection. Tamara Lovett was convicted in January of criminal negligence causing death. During the trial it emerged that Lovett gave her son Ryan dandelion tea and oil of oregano when he developed the infection. In passing sentence on Friday, the court ruled that Ryan suffered terribly and his death was excruciating and unnecessary.

———

BACK TO WORK BILL TABLED IN ONTARIO COLLEGE STRIKE: The Ontario government has introduced back to work legislation to end a five-week strike by faculty at the province’s colleges. The governing Liberals tried to introduce a bill Thursday night but it required the consent of all members of the House and the New Democrats did not agree to immediate introduction. The legislature will sit through the weekend to debate the bill.

———

HALIFAX MAYOR SAYS CITY WILL BE ON THE SIDELINES IN ATTRACTING CFL FRANCHISE: Halifax Mayor Mike Savage says a bid to bring a Canadian Football League team to his city is exciting. But Savage says his municipality will not be leading the effort to land a team. The CFL said Thursday it has been talking with a group looking to obtain an expansion franchise for Halifax. Halifax does not have a suitable stadium and Savage said in a statement that it’s not a spending priority for the municipality.

———

JESSE JACKSON REVEALS HE HAS PARKINSON’S DISEASE: The Rev. Jesse Jackson says he’s been seeking outpatient care for two years for Parkinson’s disease and plans to “dedicate” himself to physical therapy. In a Friday letter to supporters, the American civil rights icon says family and friends noticed a change in him about three years ago and he could no longer ignore symptoms. Jackson has been a strong voice in anti-discrimination efforts, including advocating for affordable housing, and has been a fixture at protests nationwide.

———

WHITE HOUSE SAYS TRUMP, FRANKEN CASES ARE DIFFERENT: The White House says there’s a difference between the sexual assault allegations against President Donald Trump and Democratic Sen. Al Franken. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders says: “Sen. Franken has admitted wrongdoing and the president hasn’t. That’s a very big distinction.” Sanders says Trump maintains that the more than one dozen accusations against him are baseless, adding the outcome of the November 2016 election justifies his position. “The American people spoke pretty loud and clear when they elected him president,” she said on Friday. Sanders adds the U.S. confrontation with allegations of impropriety by powerful men across the media, business and political worlds is “an uncomfortable conversation for the country.”

———